Dove – S/T (2004)

In a world where essential truths are hidden, obscured by our imperfect inferential machinery, and further obscured by those who wish to exploit them, the search for purity can be a long, frustrating one.

There is a pattern evident as an artist first takes their fledgling flights into the public eye.  First they are ignored, then shunned, then actively resisted, and finally, embraced: sucked into the media machine, stripped of all their originality, talent, voice and sound, hung out to dry whilst these attributes are commodified, categorised, compounded to form the mould called a ‘genre’.  Until a fickle audience becomes bored by the stream of acts pressed ill-fittingly into the mould and passed of under the guise of variety, the artistic merits of the pioneer’s vision are pillaged, left bare:  a figure-head martyr shamed by their ill-begotten legacy.

As an increasingly fickle audience becomes ever harder to please, and true talent treads a safe distance from the mainstream, a beleagured record-industry can be seen hopelessly mashing together old archived genre-moulds in a desperate attempt to convince the world that they are fostering original new talent.

Away from the cynicism of commercial co-opting of art, cross-fertilisation between different artists, bands, sounds or ideas can yield the most natural refreshing music around.
Dove’s 2004 self-titled debut and only album has its moments reminiscent of hardcore, doom, sludge and stoner metal, effortlessly blended, and free of the radical posturing, faux-occultism, self-righteous bombast and creative drought too often a factor in the aforementioned scenes.

Hidden from the mainstream gravity-machine, a chance aggregation of musicians from commonly disparate ventures actually worked, and stayed hidden long enough not to be spoiled.

You'll find me in the vast wilderness of British Columbia, talking metal at LURKER, or working in publishing and front-end web/eBook development.

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